Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorDaniel, John
dc.contributor.authorKanwar, Asha
dc.contributor.authorUvalić-Trumbić, Stamenka
dc.coverage.spatialGlobalen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-03T00:14:44Z
dc.date.available2015-09-03T00:14:44Z
dc.date.issued2007-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11599/1520
dc.description.abstractIn the coming decades the global profile of tertiary education will be transformed by the multiplication and growth of institutions in the developing world. Age participation rates in tertiary education are below 10% in many poorer countries. To achieve the rate of 35% considered the threshold for 'developed' status these countries will greatly expand forms of provision that are marginal in richer countries today: private for-profit institutions, distance learning, and cross-border operations. When today's developing countries account for the majority of college students, tertiary education worldwide will look even more diversified as commercial providers adopt the systems and technologies of production and service industries. With appropriate international safeguards and national regulation, however, the benefits to individuals of this global expansion of access of tertiary education will outweigh any concerns that higher learning is losing its soul in a huge marketplace.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherCommonwealth of Learning (COL)en_US
dc.subjectHigher Educationen_US
dc.subjectDeveloping Worlden_US
dc.subjectMass Educationen_US
dc.titleMass Tertiary Education in the Developing World: Distant Prospect or Distinct Possibility?en_US
dc.typeJournal Articleen_US


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)


Show simple item record