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dc.contributor.authorPrinsloo, Paul
dc.coverage.spatialAfricaen_US
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-09T22:58:15Z
dc.date.available2017-08-09T22:58:15Z
dc.date.issued2017-07
dc.identifier.issn2311-1550
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11599/2774
dc.description.abstractBoth the task of identifying leadership in distance education, as well as leadership per se, does not happen in a vacuum. We need to understand the definition of leadership and the processes of identifying leadership in a particular historical context (Evans and Nation, 1992). It is clear that we cannot and should not document contributions to distance education on the African continent without seriously accounting for how these contributions and the documentation of these contributions were and are shaped by Africa’s history, past and present. // This article’s attempt to celebrate the contributions of a number of African individuals is taking place at a particular junction in history, and is, despite this article’s limitations, a purposeful act, not only to celebrate but also to provide a counter-narrative to some of the uncontested beliefs and claims regarding distance education on the African continent.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherCommonwealth of Learning (COL)en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of Learning for Development;vol. 4, no. 2
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/en_US
dc.source.urihttp://jl4d.org/index.php/ejl4d/article/view/225/211en_US
dc.subjectLeadershipen_US
dc.subjectOpen and Distance Learning (ODL)en_US
dc.titleLeaders in Distance Education on the African Continenten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US


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