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dc.contributor.authorBalaji, Venkataraman
dc.contributor.authorKanwar, Asha
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-30T20:05:56Z
dc.date.available2015-06-30T20:05:56Z
dc.date.issued2015-06
dc.identifier.citationBalaji, Venkataraman and Kanwar, Asha, (2015-2016). Changing the Tune: MOOCs for Human Development? A Case Study. In: MOOCs and Open Education Around the World, New York: Routledge, Pp. 206-217.
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11599/882
dc.descriptionThis is an author version pre-print. There may be changes between this and the published version.
dc.description.abstractThe Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) is covered in critical analysis as well as in popular media as a development exclusively bearing on the Higher Education sector (The Economist, 2014). This term has also acquired an informal brand connotation – it refers to a package of course offerings, platforms, and processes identified with three pioneering organizations, namely edX, Coursera, and Udacity who tend to offer lecture and content-based MOOCs or “xMOOCs.” A thoroughly informed analysis of MOOCs has tended to focus on their role and impact in higher education in North America (Hollands & Tirthali, 2014). In contrast, proponents of connectivist MOOCs or “cMOOCs” have focused on pedagogy and style (for example, see Siemens, 2014).en_US
dc.subjectMassive Open Online Courses (MOOC)en_US
dc.subjectOpen Educational Resources (OER)en_US
dc.titleChanging the Tune: MOOCs for Human Development? A Case Study (Pre-print)en_US
dcterms.typePreprint
col.bookchapter.booktitleChanging the Tune: MOOCs for Human Development? A Case Study (Pre-print)en_US


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